Projects

YTM is a hive of activity with historical, restoration, and renovation work.  Our current projects include a loan of LCC-1 LeTourneau Sno-Train (The Monster); interior renovations creating Transportation Station -- our youth zone; exterior renovations gussying up the building; a new railroad inspired Museum Store; restoration of our Fairchild CF-BXF and our Waco CF-BDZ; youth programming and youth inspired interpretation.

Phew!

LCC-1 LeTourneau Sno-Train

LCC: Logistical Cargo Carrier.

The LeTourneau LCC-1 Sno-Train was intended for D.E.W. line radar station supply in Northern Yukon and Alaska.  In 1955 LeTourneau won the landtrain contract from the US Army Transportation Corps.  Prior to its dispatch to the D.E.W. line it was tested first in Michigan, shortly thereafter it completed further testing on the Greenland ice cap. 

The Sno-Train in action - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_SfjoSg9nU

Sno-Train arrival at the museum - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OSAuDqBdMIk

The Sno-Train (Monster!) has arrived!

Restoration Projects

Fairchild CF-BXF

5 guys and the CF-BXF

CF-BXF, a 1928 Fairchild FC-2W2, was imported in 1943 by Northern Airways Ltd. of Carcross, along with three other similar Fairchilds. All four of the vintage workhorses flew long hours on the wartime Alcan and Canol projects, and on general bush charters through to the end of the 1940s. In 1949 BXF was up-graded to a "71C" model, after which it plied the communities and logging camps of the B.C. coast for several years with various coastal operators. When it met its demise at a logging camp in Jervis Inlet on June 27, 1967 in a take-off accident, it was the last working Fairchild 71 in Canada.

In 2004 BXF was repatriated to the Yukon (courtesy of the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley) by Yukon aviation historian Bob Cameron, for restoration and display at the Yukon Transportation Museum (YTM). In the restoration, 99% of the metal structure and components are original, but are not in certifiable condition for flight. (i.e. we are restoring the original historic airplane - not building a replica!)

CF-BDZ Restoration

Today BXF is assembled and on display at YTM as an almost-complete airframe, without fabric. Before the fabric can be applied, wood stringers, window and door frames have to be installed on the fuselage. YTM located and purchased a set of Edo YD 6470 floats in Alaska, for eventual installation on BXF.

 

Custom Waco CF-BDZ

 CF-BDZ was purchased new from the factory by Northern Airways in January 1938. It was initially acquired to serve a new scheduled air service, from Vancouver to Dawson City. After making five such round trips against daunting odds of weather and logistics, the service was dropped by Northern Airways (co-incident with the mail contract being awarded to McConachie's United Air Transport). For the next eleven years BDZ served the bush charter demands of Northern Airways out of Carcross, including hundreds of hours on the Alcan and Canol projects. In October 1949, it accidentally burned at the dock during start-up, and the charred airframe was discarded in the swamp and willows at the side of the Carcross airport.

In 1977, Bob Cameron salvaged the weathered skeleton for future restoration in a Yukon museum. Today, a non-flying restoration is underway, utilizing the original airframe. To date, the steel fuselage truss (frame) is sand-blasted and painted, and standing on its landing gear. The wooden ribs for all four wings are constructed, and the lower left wing is ready for fabric covering. The YTM has acquired the original skis for BDZ, and a restored Jacobs L-6MB.